Dating carnival glass


Nearly all the major European glass-making centers produced some. Glass electrical powerline insulators are also found in Carnival glass, although the intent of production was not ornamental.The application of metallic salts to the surface of power line insulators was practiced in an effort to increase the effectiveness of the insulating properties of the product (i.e., reducing loss/leakage of the electric current to the surrounding environment).Fenton maintained their position as the largest manufacturer and were one of very few makers to use a red colored glass base for their carnival glass.After interest declined in the late 1920s, Fenton stopped producing carnival glass for many years.In more recent years, due to a resurgence in interest, Fenton restarted production of carnival glass and has made it until around 2007.



A final firing of the glass brings out the iridescent properties of the salts, giving carnival glass the distinct appearance it is known for.Most carnival glass insulators, made by Corning Glass Works [Pyrex] and Hemingray Glass Company, typically date from the 1920s and 1930s.They are avidly collected by both carnival glass buffs as well as strictly insulator collectors.(An Indiana blue carnival hen is pictured on that page). Some significant production continued outside the US through the depression years of the early 1930s, tapering off to very little by the 1940s.

For more info on glassware made by Indiana, including carnival, check out this site: Indiana Glass. Often the same molds were used to produce clear and transparent colored glass as well as carnival versions, so producers could switch production between these finishes easily according to the current demand / popularity.

Many types of articles, both ornamental as well as utilitarian, were made with the ‘carnival’ finish, and patterns ranged from simple through geometric and ‘cut’ styles to pictorial and figurative.



Dating carnival glass comments


  • Carnival glass - Wikipedia profil de paulette60

    paulette60

    Carnival glass is moulded or pressed glass, always with a pattern and always with a shiny, metallic, 'iridescent' surface shimmer. The keys to its appeal were that it looked superficially like the much finer and much more expensive blown iridescent glass by Tiffany, Loetz and others and also that the cheerful bright finish.…
  • Carnival-Glass-Identification-of-Patterns-Look-CLOSE- - eBay profil de paulette60

    paulette60

    The main companies of antique real Carnival Glass are Fenton, Millersburg, Dugan, and Northwood. Other smaller companies include, Westmoreland and. To date these reissued pieces, the numbers which follows the Fenton name is the decade in which it was made. For example, if there's a piece with "Fenton 9" that.…
  • What is Carnival Glass? - Glass Bottle Marks profil de paulette60

    paulette60

    The insulating properties of the product i.e. reducing loss/leakage of the electric current to the surrounding environment. Most carnival glass insulators, made by Corning Glass Works Pyrex and Hemingray Glass Company, typically date from the 1920s and 1930s. They are avidly collected by both carnival glass buffs as.…
  • Carnival Glass Network Public Group Facebook profil de paulette60

    paulette60

    Carnival Glass Network has 7504 members. The purpose of this Public Group is to offer a friendly home for Carnival Glass collectors and researchers.…
  • David Doty's Carnival Glass Website profil de paulette60

    paulette60

    Website for David Doty's Field Guide to Carnival Glass.…
  • Collecting Carnival Glass History Colours & Patterns - - Antique Marks profil de paulette60

    paulette60

    A trawl through various books on glass produces a variety of dates and it seems that no-one is absolutely certain when the various manufacturers first developed their carnival glass products, although it is known that by 1905 the first cheap, carnival glass, that rivalled the expensive Tiffany glass, was in production.…